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MPs won’t get a say on post-Brexit trade deals, claims government minister

International Trade Secretary Liz Truss has claimed that MPs will not get to vote on post-Brexit trade deals, despite their potential impact on the future of the country.

Speaking to the International Trade Committee this morning, Truss was asked by Labour MP Owen Smith whether she will provide Parliament with a yes/no vote on future trade agreements.

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However, Truss flatly rejected this idea, saying that international treaties are an “executive prerogative” (i.e. they are negotiated and approved by the government alone).

This would essentially mean that the Prime Minister and a small group of Cabinet ministers would be free to fundamentally restructure Britain’s economy, without asking for Parliament’s consent.

Reacting to Truss’s statement, trade expert David Henig was not too impressed with this idea. He tweeted: “If you should learn at least one thing about the last three years it would be that government cannot ignore Parliament in making international treaties, particularly those with wide public interest.”

If Truss gets her way, and if Parliament approves Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal, MPs will be granting the Prime Minister absolute control to shape Britain’s economy for the next 100 years.

For most MPs, and especially Labour ones, that should be a terrifying prospect.

Britain: Tell the world that Boris Johnson’s wannabe dictatorship doesn’t speak for you.

13 responses to “MPs won’t get a say on post-Brexit trade deals, claims government minister

  1. THERE WILL NOW BE NO PROTECTION FOR THE NHS IN A TRUMP TRADE DEAL:

    The real reason Parliament was prorogued for a second time was to scrap the Trade Bill with amendments which would have given Parliament a say over future trade deals.

    International Trade Secretary Liz Truss has just confirmed NHS campaigners worst fears, that MPs will not get to vote on post-Brexit trade deals.

    This means that Johnson and his cabinet (many of whom want to see an end to free healthcare) can agree any terms they want in a USUK trade deal and there is nothing that anyone can do to stop them.

    The Queen’s Speech showed that Johnson would not be tabling any legislation to put in place the numerous legal protections that would be needed to take the NHS off the table.

    The last hope was that when a Trade Bill was reintroduced it would have included the amendments agreed to previously that would allow MPs to scrutinise such deals and reject them if they put the NHS in danger. Now it is clear that even that last defence safeguard had gone.

    The NHS is at the complete mercy of Johnson and Trump who have a history of being untrustworthy and breaking commitments they have previously made.

    NHS campaigners across the country need to be made aware of this latest development. Please help spread the word.

  2. This is a bloodless coup. It is vital that those MPs who still possess the wit to realise the true nature of the situation step up and fulfil their responsibilities as advocates for the people of the UK. They can neither rely on nor gauge strength of opinion from popular uprisings (such as XR) which can so easily be thwarted by a mixture of draconian policing laws and media indifference. They must act decisively before it is too late.

  3. haha you cant see the irony of calling it a dictatorship but you are happy to completely ignore democracy,bunch of idiots

    1. Dear Breck-sit. I am not going to call you an idiot. You obviously care about democracy and think it is worth fighting for. Good. But for democracy to work and not quickly morph into a dictatorship it needs a number of things. Firstly you need to try to get your facts straight, that may not be easy and we can all get things wrong and new facts can emerge. Secondly in democracy as in personal life we have a right to change our minds. Read up how the Nazis came to power through elections and what they did to democracy afterwards. Thirdly, however we may feel privately, bringing abuse into a public debate erodes the democratic process. Read up what Churchill said about respecting the rights of others who disagree with you.

  4. “Oh my goodness, the sky is going to fall!” Said the headless Chicken, running around in circles, frothing at the mouth.
    Trade deals have always been negotiated by Government without the need for tying the negotiaters and negotiations up with the need for politically motivated scrutiny. If we do not like what a government is doing, then we have the ultimate say at the ballot box.

    1. Hahahahahahaha take a breath….
      Hahahahaha he thinks voting matters! Hahahahahaahaha omg… the government has never done what the people want! whether you vote for it or not.

  5. If this is true, then I think civil servants should refuse to work to implement these ..Plus think people should be looking for hackers to get into government and screw it up…This man is a nasty peice of work, only looking out for himself and his cronnies..🤬🤬🤬

  6. I must be dreaming, your sentiments would be appropriate were we living in a totalitarian state like China or Russia, or do you subscribe to the delusion that communist states are exemplary in their regard for peoples rights? Ask the Muslim inhabitants of the so called People’s Republic of China, languishing in correction camps, oh sorry, you think that people who do not agree with the policy’s of Putin and Xi should be considered as enemies of the state and incarcerated or worse.

  7. It sounds quite shocking, and with Boris at the helm at least possible. But it just might not be true, let’s face it, does Liz Truss have a clue? A more abysmal Minister is hardly imaginable.

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