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Brexit Party in turmoil as another general election candidate defects to the Tories

The Brexit Party is in a state of near-meltdown, after another one of its candidates has decided to defect to the Conservatives.

Calum Walker, who was the party’s candidate for Dundee East, announced on Twitter earlier today that he wouldn’t be standing for Farage’s party, and instead called on voters to back the Tories.

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Explaining his decision, Walker said that voting for the Brexit Party, “runs the risk of allowing Labour propped up by the SNP into government.”

This comes after the party’s candidate for Dudley South, Paul Brothwood, announced that he had quit the party and was now backing the Conservatives.

In fact, there have been reports that Farage has lost as many as 20 candidates in recent weeks, after he decided to attack Boris Johnson’s Brexit deal and launch a full-fat election campaign against the Tories (which many believe will split the pro-Brexit vote).

There has been a suggestion that Walker was pushed out of the party before he decided to defect, with fellow general election candidate Danyaal Raja claiming that he was deselected.

Either way, the Brexit Party is spontaneously combusting ahead of polling day in six weeks. Shame.

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9 responses to “Brexit Party in turmoil as another general election candidate defects to the Tories

  1. So the EU is wonderful and so supportive of the UK how do we exist without them? Well quite frankly we can’t every single project and mode of transport is embarrassingly reliant on us now begging the EU to help us in every way from feeding our own people to moving them around! .My own industry glass for 28 years has seen EU funding used to build a new furnace ( for a USA glass company] right here in the UK while a UK based family business since 1826 was somehow blatantly refused ? sadly during my time as a political supporter and promoter I witnessed EU funding being used for similar projects , In France I even heard laughing and laughter as another UK home grown business lost out to a company that had been imported to the UK! That was in the 1980s .. I warmed and was ignored and told it was globalisation live with it , incidentally by the very person that was well paid to assist in yet another development project . You know a coal field that used to employ 10000+ LOST to progress and a news busting input of 2000 new jobs with EU funding. YOU GET THE PICTURE .. I have lost count and interest and will happily retire in just a few years thankfully having dodged FLTs with Romanian drivers going the wrong way surely a hazard waiting to kill some innocent person ah well that’s globalisation isn’t it . The UKs idleness arrogance and ignorance has been a big problem and that has and will cost us all dearly… now you can just sit at your computer and trust google or walk around every industrial estate and take a quick look .. good luck keep supporting the EU because high up they are out to squeeze every bit of asset away from us and leave us a shadow of our former nation .. I hope you enjoy your next weekend count all the German french Italian Korean and Swedish cars on our roads and you will say our industry did not compete why you say read this again idleness is a national illness..

  2. EU FUNDING comes from the money we give them It goes like this – we give them £100 and they give us £39, for projects like yours and many others in the UK. We could keep the £100, double the “EU Funding” and still have change for a night out & kebab

  3. Nigel would be happy to help Boris Johnson, if he had taken the route of a WTO Brexit. Unfortunately the treaty Boris has gone for, leaves us under much of the EU rules and regs. This in turn has effects on our trade laws,tariffs,our fishing waters and our boarders, and in an EU army, with out representation, no vote, voice or veto, plus as well as the 39 Billion so called divorce bill, it will cost around a a futher 36 billion pounds. We would be tied to the EU till the end of 2022 and then only be allowed to leave if the EU Courts of Justice allow us to. This could be extended indefinatly.It is Brexit in name only.This would not be good for the UK. We would be leaving in name only, and in my opinion be worse of than we are now. The one thing we do agree on , Is we need to leave the EU.

  4. What a pointless move.
    The Tory’s are on course to lose every MP in, Scotland.
    Mind you, any BP candidate will lose his/her deposit up here. They are not wanted or, welcome.
    This is the end of the U.K. we are witnessing, not the end of the E.U

  5. Owen: I think you need to follow your points through. Your point that “..idleness is a national illness.”, may have some element of truth , but is I think very exaggerated. I have heard similar points made back from before we even joined the Common Market, and in every decade since especially during the Thatcher years.

    But let us suppose that you are right. What does this imply? That it is all the EU’s fault? : In the past this has been blamed on everything from post-imperial complacency, to trade unions, and the welfare state!

    That we have been taken advantage of, by the EU and global business? Maybe. But wouldn’t we be just as much, or even more at risk under Trump’s great deal, or WTA rules?

    Perhaps a better way of stating your argument would be to say that as nation (or nations) we need to sharpen up our act, at all levels of society. But that applies whether we leave or remain in the EU.

    But perhaps what you are saying is that leaving the EU will in some way cure us of this. If so, then this sounds very like the old Thatcherite argument from the eighties, (the cold bath treatment) that of a period of hard times, will some how bring us to wake up and joint the “struggle to survive”. Have a look at the old mining areas, and industrial regions which “benefited” from this approach under Thatcher. Did it work? I would suggest to you that its effects were exactly the opposite: It reinforced a sense of powerlessness, in those communities, and left us more reliant on banking and service industries.

    Well, from feeling powerless to seeking to get back control, seems like a healthy first step, but in needs to be based on a realistic appraisal of the global environment, not wishful thinking.

  6. When you know EU is evil, why you want to make deal with evil ideology. EU is built on deception.
    Mr. Boris Johnson is not wise. Deceived by Europe. Mr. Johnson please do not make any deal with EU. You are taking the whole UK to die in a ditch. You told you will rather die in a ditch rather making deal with Europe. You are No. 1 UK LIER.

  7. What a load of codswallop. you may as well have been staffing up a wall tbh.

    Where the UK has not done so well is with using the EU rules to their advantage. What they have done exceptionally well is using EU as a scapegoat for our own failures.

    Even though I agree in principle to free movement of people, EU countries can delay new members having access to their markets during the initial period. Hence Germany waited for 4 years when Poland joined before there was free movement. We, on the other hand, did not. We then blaim EU for our own incompetent.

    Don’t hate the player, hate the game. Trump would love to have us over a barrel, and would be far worse than the EU in that regard…

  8. The EU is a very corrupt establishment , and if you can’t see that your walking around with your eyes shut, Brexit as shown just how corrupt our own establishment is the politicians ,civil service and the judicial system all geared for their own means ,I would like to see it all reformed.

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